Slide show: Common skin rashes

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Atopic dermatitis
Skin rashes can occur from a variety of factors, including infections, heat, allergens, immune system disorders and medications. One of the most common skin disorders that causes a rash is atopic dermatitis (ay-TOP-ik dur-muh-TI-tis), also known as eczema.

Atopic dermatitis is an ongoing (chronic) rash that causes skin to become thickened, itchy and dry. On brown and Black skin, the condition may also cause small bumps around hair follicles that look like goose bumps.

Most often the rashy patches of atopic dermatitis occur where the skin flexes — such as inside the knees (A) and on the ankles (B). The condition tends to flare up periodically.

At-home interventions can lessen symptoms and reduce the risk of flare-ups. Self-care habits include:

Avoiding harsh soaps and other irritants
Applying creams or lotions regularly
Applying prescription anti-itch creams or ointments

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Dec. 16, 2021

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